Equip your Facilitator’s Toolkit

This September we are excited to be offering a fantastic training opportunity for people who facilitate meetings, events, and workshops based in the South West.

The two-day ‘Facilitator’s Toolkit’ workshop, delivered by the Association of Facilitators, is a short course that will refresh the basics of facilitator style and provide you with new ways and confidence to lead groups and teams with a focus on assertiveness for facilitators. It is designed for those who want to consolidate, broaden and enliven their style of facilitation. You will be provided with facilitation models, tools and tips.

Course Content

This is an introductory course in facilitation, but it is not basic. If you are looking for a core facilitation model, and are keen to develop your personal style – then this is for you.

The workshop will explore your role as a group facilitator, paying particular attention to skills practice, and awareness building in the live group setting. Participants will have the opportunity to complete the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Inventory, a short questionnaire designed to identify ones preferred approach to conflict and to broaden one’s skill base. We shall apply assertiveness to the role of facilitator and consider Dimensions of Facilitator Style, a practical toolkit designed to equip you with the confidence and skill to effectively handle group processes and group tasks.

You will learn how to direct and guide groups assertively, this includes leading in cooperative and autonomous ways. You will be encouraged to become aware of your own skills, experience, personality and preferences, and use and flex your facilitator style with self-awareness, authority and personal presence. The topic of Group Dynamics is introduced in the context of choosing an appropriate facilitation style and approach.

Practical skills will include: 
  • Developing an assertive style
  • Managing passive, aggressive, or manipulative behaviours.
  • Contracting, setting and managing expectations
  • Being a catalyst for learning and development – moving things forward
  • Handling emotions, particularly where they hinder group effectiveness
  • Challenging and confronting limiting behaviours and attitudes
  • Working with the prevailing group dynamics to create positive outcomes
  • Planning and structuring a facilitated session
Who is this for?

If you are:

  • Working as a consultant, change agent, trainer to a client organisation
  • Working within an organisation as a change agent, group/team leader, manager or project manager
  • In chairing roles at meetings with a developmental purpose (be that business, charity or education)
  • Occasionally called upon to facilitate groups, meetings and teams
  • Embarking upon a career in facilitation.

Cost: £425 including the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Inventory

Click here to book your place

Guest Blog: Join Us in Year Two of Citizen Curators

Dr Tehmina Goskar is the Director of the Curatorial Research Centre and leads Cornwall Museums Partnership’s Citizen Curators programme. We are delighted that Tehmina has kindly written this blog to answer a few FAQs  for anyone who is interested in taking part in the programme.

We have just completed a successful Year One of the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund supported Citizen Curators programme. 29 participants who joined as volunteers at their chosen museum successfully completed the programme and received a certificate for their accomplishment.

If you are interested in taking part in Year Two of Citizen Curators, here are some of your questions answered.

Two of the Citizen Curators examining some of Penlee House Gallery and Museum's collection in the object handling session.

 

What is Citizen Curators?

Citizen Curators is a free work-based training programme in museum awareness and modern curatorial practice aimed at volunteers from our community. The programme is provided by Cornwall Museums Partnership in collaboration with seven museums. It is funded for three years by the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund administered by the Museums Association. The Programme Leader is Dr. Tehmina Goskar, Curator & Director of the Curatorial Research Centre.

 

When and where does it take place?

The Citizen Curators course takes place between October 2019 – April 2020. Seven Cornish museums are taking part in the programme: Cornwall’s Regimental Museum, Bodmin, Wheal Martyn Clay Works, near St Austell, Royal Cornwall Museum, Truro, Falmouth Art Gallery, Museum of Cornish Life, Helston, Penlee House Gallery and Museum, Penzance and Telegraph Museum Porthcurno.

 

How many places are there?

Each museum has five places. Each year there will be approximately 35 volunteers undertaking the Citizen Curators course.

 

What experience and qualifications do I need?

None. Just a thirst for learning, the ability to demonstrate your curiosity, and be willing to find things out for yourself. You should be able to commit the time needed to make the most of this opportunity. We encourage you bring and to talk about your existing skills and previous experience.

 

A Citizen Curator creating music by hitting a silver plate with a spoon during the interpretation session.

 

How much time do I have to spend on the programme?

You must attend the six core sessions: collections, communities, research, interpretation, communication and curating the Cornish National Collection. These will take place on a monthly basis from October. They will take place in one of the museums in your group. That means about one full day per month. In addition, you will be working on researching and creating content about the collections in your museum. This might be according to a brief set by the museum or it might be on something your group thinks is important. You can expect to commit to between 4 hours to 1 day per fortnight on this. You are welcome to volunteer more hours but this is entirely down to you and your museum. There are also optional opportunities such as field trips and discussion events you will be invited to take part in.

 

What kinds of things will interest me?

Museum collections contain a wealth of untapped knowledge, stories, and ideas from political events and abstract art to family history and science. Our museums are waiting for you to help them share that knowledge with different people. If you get excited by new discoveries, finding something out or asking probing questions then Citizen Curators is for you. The course will teach you how to curate thoughtfully and meaningfully. It will help you to see the relationship between knowledge creation and communication and you will gain a whole set of specific skills as a result.

This year the cohort will be invited to research collections to highlight new stories, particularly those of under-represented people and subjects. This will also include getting involved in the creation of a Cornish National Collection that will reflect the diversity of Cornish society past and present, while also highlighting our distinctive culture.

 

Two Citizen Curators learn how to

 

What do I need to do to sign up?

The seven participating museums are beginning to look for their next candidates. In the first instance, check out their websites and get in touch with the museum that most appeals to you. In due course, they will send you a questionnaire to complete and we will take it from there.

You can contact the museums participating in Citizen Curators by clicking the links below:

Cornwall’s Regimental Museum 

Falmouth Art Gallery

Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

Penlee House Gallery and Museum

Royal Cornwall Museum

Telegraph Museum Porthcurno

Wheal Martyn

 

Dr Tehmina Goskar
Director, Curatorial Research Centre

Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019

In March, Cornwall Museums Partnership and SW Museum Development hosted the annual Cornwall Heritage Awards to celebrate and champion the amazing work that’s taking place across museums in Cornwall.

In our final blog looking back at this year’s awards, we take a shine a light on the Cornish Object of the Year Award. This category was open to public vote and showcased some of the magnificent objects in museum collections across Cornwall.

Winner – Cornish Object of Year Award
The Gurney Stove – The Castle Heritage Centre Bude

 

The Castle Heritage Centre, Bude, collecting the award for winning Cornish Object of the Year 2019.

 

The Gurney Stove – located at The Castle Heritage Centre, Bude – was one of the most successful inventions of Cornishman Sir Goldsworthy Gurney. A forerunner to the modern radiator, the stove had a unique design, resting in a trough of water that transmitted heat as it evaporated. The Gurney Stove heated over 10,000 churches, schools, and government buildings across the country including St. Paul’s Cathedral. There are still some working examples in cathedrals at Chester, Hereford and Tewkesbury.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring the Gurney Stove.

 

Highly Commended – Cornish Object of the Year Award

 

 

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

 

The Bethlehem Pasty – located at the Museum of Cornish Life, Helston – was carved from stone by William (Bill) Jewell in Bethlehem in 1943, when he was feeling homesick for Cornwall during WWII. Bill kept his handmade memento throughout his life. Bill’s family chose to donate the pasty along with photos, medals, and archive documents to the museum to keep his story going.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring the Bethlehem Pasty.

Museum staff holding the Bethlehem Pasty and an old picture of the maker Mr Jewell

 

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Cornish Global Migration Programme

 

The Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – located at Cornish Global Migration Programme in Redruth – is a symbol of the ‘Great Cornish Diaspora’ where many Cornish men went to follow the lure of riches in gold rushes across the globe. Many sent home money made from their endeavours to support their extended families in Cornwall. The more successful migrants would send home artefacts such as jewellery.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring the Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery.

 

 

The Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

 

The Penzance Market Cross is a treasure of the town. Over 1000 years old, standing 7ft tall and weighing almost a ton, it is carved from a single slab of local granite. It currently sits outside Penlee House Gallery and Museum, the latest of seven locations around the town. In earlier times, the cross had inscriptions on all four sides, but centuries of weathering and erosion mean that these designs are now hard to make out.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring the Penzance Market Cross.

 

 

St. Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

 

The St. Mary’s Church Clock hand – located at The Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol – is from one of only two single-handed clocks found in Cornwall. Dating from the 1700s, St Mary’s Church in East Looe is a well-known landmark just a few metres from the beach. The clock on the church tower was made by John Belling of Bodmin, whose family later went into making domestic goods such as the “Baby Belling” cooker.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring St. Marys Church Clock Hand.

 

 

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

 

This example of Rolls Royce’s automotive icon is located at Wheal Martyn Clay Works and represents the enduring relationship between Cornish clay and the aerospace industry. Developed in Cornwall in the 1930s, Molochite from which the mould is constructed, would become an important element in the casting of turbines blades for jet engines. Due to this Rolls Royce would become one of Cornwall’s china clay industry’s most prestigious customers.

Click here to watch the Cornish Object of the Year vlog featuring the ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould.

 

Best Project on a Budget 2019

In March, Cornwall Museums Partnership and South West Museum Development hosted the annual Cornwall Heritage Awards to celebrate and champion the amazing work that is taking place across museums in Cornwall.

This week we are focusing on the Best Project on a Budget, which highlights projects that have been achieved for less than £500.

Best Project on a Budget  – Winner
Saltash Heritage: Volunteers are the Lifeblood of our Museum.

 

Wishing to celebrate the dedication and commitment of their 48 volunteers, Saltash Heritage has sought to enhance their volunteers experiences through setting up training sessions, talks, and an annual awards ceremony. In the light-hearted awards ceremony, the achievements of the volunteers were recognised with bronze stars they could wear on their lanyards, these included awards such as ‘Museum Squatter’ for the volunteer with the most amount of hours and ‘The One to Always Leap Out of His Chair’.

 

 

Best Project on a Budget – Highly Commended

 

 

Lostwithiel Museum: Creating a Corporate Identity.

 

In February 2018, Lostwithiel Museum launched a whole new corporate identity featuring a new logo and corporate look for all communications including print, signage, and digital output. The new look has allowed the museum to strengthen its brand awareness, providing a cohesive appearance for visitors and allowing the museum to raise its profile. With the new signs, visitors on arrival to the town are able to instantly recognise the museum, that the museum is open, and that admission is free. Since the introduction of the branding, visitor numbers have increased by 60%.

Highly Commended – Bodmin Town Museum: Space Creation/Conservation

 

Through converting a small hidden cupboard into a new hanging storage facility Bodmin Town Museum have improved the conservation of their costume collection. As part of the process of creating the new storage space, each costume item was recorded, catalogued and photographed. The project has allowed the team at the museum to learn more about their costume collection, enabling them to display items and create better access to the collection in future.

Emerging Voices Bursary

The Emerging Voices bursary supports museum volunteers or emerging professionals to undertake training, research or placement opportunities that enhance their skills and bring new benefits to their host museum.

We want to support people who are new to museums to take an active role in developing great experiences and sharing their knowledge with the widest possible audiences.

 

Who can apply?

To be eligible you must:

  • Have an existing relationship with your host museum (either as an employee, volunteer or participant in a regular programme of activity e.g. Citizen Curators or Young Curators)
  • Demonstrate the skills/training need, the benefit to both you as the applicant and your host museum and how this will lead to new approaches or ways of working.
  • Have sought approval from your host museum prior to applying

 

What can you apply for?

We will consider all applications on their individual merit and the difference they are likely to make.

Applications can be made for attending training, conferences or events, undertaking a placement or research opportunity where this leads to sharing of knowledge with audiences, activity which supports greater collaboration and skill-sharing between museums in Cornwall and organisations elsewhere.

You can apply to cover the costs of training, research, travel, back-fill of your time (if you are a member of staff), and any modest material costs that enables you to put your learning into practice. Equipment costs will not be covered.

 

What should your application demonstrate?

  • Value for money and need. We want to support activity which will bring real value to both the individual and host museum and that would not otherwise happen.
  • Collaboration. We want to support individuals, museums and other organisations to work together and to learn and share knowledge with one another.
  • Innovation. We want to support activity that will embolden museums to try new or different approaches. (You may not know exactly how you will put your learning into practice prior to applying however you should have demonstrated what you anticipate may happen as a result of your learning opportunity.)
  • Inclusive. We want to support activity that shares learning across the organisation with other staff and volunteers and which benefits, and makes a difference to, audiences.

 

How much can you apply for?

You can apply for between £500 – £2,000.

 

Sharing the learning

Successful applicants will be required to create two blogs (or vlogs), one prior to/during the activity and the second one after the activity has been completed.

 

How to apply

Send your completed application form to chloe@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk by 9am Friday 24th May.

If you have any questions please call Chloe Hughes, Engagement Lead on 01209 500750.

Heritage Heroes Award 2019

In March 2019 Cornwall Museums Partnership and South West Museum Development hosted the annual Cornwall Heritage Awards to celebrate and champion the amazing work that’s taking place at museums and heritage organisations in Cornwall.

The Heritage Heroes award celebrates the dedication and achievements of heritage volunteers.

 

 

Heritage Heroes Award –  Joint Winner (Larger Organisations)
Cornwall’s Regimental Museum: Relaxed Opening Team

 

This amazing volunteer team was crucial to the success of Cornwall’s Regimental Museum’s first relaxed openingdesigned for people with autism or sensory processing disorders. The insights of the team, who had experience in healthcare, nursing and teaching students with special educational needs, helped transform the museum; from adjusting levels of lighting and sound, to creating the sensory space and offering craft activities for children and young people of differing abilities. The team’s warm welcome and hands-on support meant they received lots of positive feedback. Their relaxed openings are now a regular feature at the museum.

 

 

Heritage Heroes Award –  Joint Winner (Larger Organisations)
Museum of Cornish Life, Helston: Helston Makes It!

 

Led by Jude Carroll, this group of five proactive, hardworking and truly collaborative volunteers developed and ran Helston Makes It! a two-week celebration of the town and the museum, experienced by over 1200 people. Building on the success of last year’s festival, the team took the sessions into schools, working with a local school to produce an animated film. Over the two weeks of the festival the team created an exhibition, a programme of 17 workshops, a screening of the local school’s animated film, and an end celebration event showcasing the skills of over 30 local makers.

 

 

Heritage Heroes Award – Winner (Smaller Organisations)
Lawrence House Museum, Launceston: Launceston U3A Local History Group.

 

 

The Launceston U3A Local History Group have been working for several years surveying and photographing the buildings within the old walled town and researching their history. Their work resulted in the popular ‘Launceston Buildings: Vernacular Buildings within the Old Town Walls of Launceston’ exhibition. Over a period of nearly 20 years, the History Group has also produced a series of other local history monographs, which provide a permanent record of the research by the history group and other volunteers. A copy of each monograph is sent to the Cornish Studies Library.

 

 

Heritage Heroes Award  – Highly Commended (Larger Organisations)
Telegraph Museum Porthcurno: Engineer Volunteer Team

 

 

The dedicated Engineer Volunteer team at Telegraph Museum Porthcurno give approximately 2,500 hours time to the museum every year. Their knowledge is essential to servicing and repairing the delicate and specialist equipment that is central to the museum’s Designated Collection and visitor experience. This includes the fully working Automatic Regeneration (Regen) system situated in the tunnels that forms the only authentic, working telegraph station remaining in the UK. This year the volunteers have been given a dedicated space in the museum to create the exhibition, ‘I Spy: The Secret Listeners’, which runs April – November 2019.

 

 

Heritage Heroes Award – Highly Commended (Smaller Organisations)

 

 

Padstow Museum: A New Museum for Padstow

 

When a member of the community left a generous bequest to the museum, the volunteer-led Padstow Museum focused their efforts and organised themselves into task force teams to move the museum to a new permanent location at the Old Station House. Determined to address the issues faced in their old building, the team set out to make the new museum family friendly and welcoming. This included having level access for pushchairs and wheelchairs and a hearing loop for visitors and new volunteers. Their hard work paid off as in the first five weeks, the museum received over 2,800 visitors – well above their usual number for that time of year and a great deal of positive feedback. They have also gained over £1,000 in donations – more than their previous annual intake.

 

 

Newquay Heritage Archive & Museum: Newquay Old Cornwall Presentation Team

 

The presentation team at Newquay Heritage Archive & Museum carry out the vital work of sharing the local heritage and publicising the museum. The team carry out large numbers of visual presentations throughout the year to schools, colleges, social groups and other organisations. These can cover geographically the whole of Cornwall and include not just Newquay-related historical and cultural topics, but also a wide range of Cornish subjects. Over the last year, the team carried out displays and exhibitions at ten local festivals and events interacting with over 2500 individuals, eight school and college activities with about 250 young people, 24 visual presentations, guided walks and site tours involving 850+ people. The friends and connections the presentation team make ensures the future of the museum.

 

Spotlight on: Imogen Crarer, Assistant Curator Intern at Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

In this blog we catch up with Imogen Crarer, Assistant Curator Intern at Museum of Cornish Life, Helston.

Imogen’s six-month long internship is funded by Arts Council England through Cultivator and Cornwall Museums Partnership, and is one of five new internships supported by Cornwall Museums Partnership’s NPO programme. These opportunities aim to give hands-on, practical experience and create new pathways into the heritage sector.

Imogen moving a 1920s Flapper Dress ready for an exhibition.

Imogen says, ‘My role as Assistant Curator Intern is wonderfully varied. It is giving me skills and experience in collections management, exhibitions, community engagement and meeting the daily needs of a busy museum. I have enjoyed working with the supportive staff and volunteers at MCL, and interacting with our visitors has made my experience very fulfilling. Overall, the internship is valuable in building on knowledge gained from my MA in Modern History from King’s College, London, improving my future employability in the heritage sector through specific training and more generally by providing me with transferable skills.’

Hunting out objects in one of the museum’s store rooms.

Throughout her internship Imogen has regularly featured in livestreams on Museum of Cornish Life, Helston’s social media, telling the stories behind the museum’s collections. You can find these livestreams on Youtube or by following Museum of Cornish Life on Facebook.

Cornwall Museums Partnership’s NPO programme has supported the creation of 20 jobs, five paid internships and five apprenticeships. To find out more about CMP’s NPO programme click here.

Cornish Object of the Year 2019 Vlog 6 – ‘St Mary’s Church Clock Hand’

In the run up to the Cornwall Heritage Awards, I have been visiting each of the museums with objects shortlisted for Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019, hearing from the staff and volunteers about the amazing stories behind the objects.

In my final vlog I speak to Tony Greenbank, a volunteer at The Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol in East Looe, to hear about their shortlisted object the ‘St. Mary’s Church Clock Hand’.

The story surrounding the clock hand is fascinating. The clock hand dates back to 1737 and is from one, of only two, single handed clocks located in Cornwall. In an intriguing act of local rivalry, the clock face of St. Mary’s Church located in East Looe is hidden from the view of residents in West Looe, likewise, the clock in West Looe is hidden from the view of residents of East Looe.

To vote for your favourite Cornish object click here.

Voting closes at midnight on Tuesday 12 February 2019 and the winner will be announced at the Cornwall Heritage Awards on Thursday 21 March 2019.

Peter Lower, Marketing and Events Intern

Cornish Object of the Year 2019 Vlog 5 – ‘The Gurney Stove’

In the run up to the Cornwall Heritage Awards, I have been visiting each of the museums with shortlisted objects nominated for Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019, to hear from the staff and volunteers about the amazing stories behind the objects.

In this vlog I speak to Janine King, Heritage Development Officer at The Castle, Bude, to hear about their shortlisted object the Gurney Stove.

The Gurney Stove, a predecessor to the modern radiator, was patented by Cornish inventor Sir Goldsworthy Gurney in 1856 and heated many public buildings including the Houses of Parliament and St. Paul’s Cathedral. The stove is an object belonging to Britain’s industrial age, yet aspects of the design can still be seen in radiators today, particularly the fins for radiating heat. Viewing all of Sir Goldsworthy Gurney’s different inventions made me think, once again, how the Cornish inventors of the industrial age, such as Sir Humphry Davy and Richard Trevithick had a great impact on Britain.

To vote for your favourite Cornish object click here.
Voting closes at midnight on Tuesday 12 February 2019.

– Peter Lower, Marketing and Events Intern

Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019 Vlog 2 – ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould

In the run up to the Cornwall Heritage Awards, 21 March, I have been visiting each of the shortlisted objects nominated for Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019 to hear from the staff and volunteers about the amazing stories behind the objects.

In this vlog I speak to Si Durrant, Trainee Curator at Wheal Martyn Clay Works, to hear about their object the ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould.

I have always been fascinated by the industrial heritage of Cornwall and the many different links that Cornwall has to industry all around the world. The story of this Rolls Royce icon and its accompanying Molochite mould is another great example, with Cornish clay (forming the Molochite mould) being influential in the present day aviation industry.

The Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019 is open to public vote, vote for your favourite object here.

Voting closes Midnight 12 Feb.
The winner will be announced at the Cornwall Heritage Awards, 21 March 2019.

The next vlog will feature Penlee House Gallery.

– Peter Lower, Marketing and Events Intern

 

 

 

My Experience of Firm Foundations – Elisa Harris

Presentation by CMP CEO Emmie Kell

The invitation to go on the Firm Foundations course came at the perfect time for me. Krowji had secured the match funding for Phase 2 of our redevelopment project and we were waiting for news of our ERDF bid – we have since been told it was successful!

The course is true to its name – designed to enable you to create a solid foundation before embarking on a capital project, there was a huge amount packed into just two days with a good balance of talks, site visits and tasks making it very engaging. During the first half of the course we were given direct access to an impressive list of experts covering everything from board structure to funding and marketing to risk management.

Highlights for me included a talk by Eden’s CEO Gordon Seabright, in which he spoke very candidly about the successes and challenges he’s faced during his time at Eden, and an informal surgery with Phil Gendall of Wolf Rock focussed on creating a clear message in your marketing materials. The risk assessment of preparing and eating a cream tea was also a lot of fun!

Firm Foundations has been designed for small groups of delegates in order to create an open, honest and safe environment in which to share experiences and ask questions. It’s relevant to all levels so there’s a good mix of people who have worked on capital projects and those who have never done anything like this before.

CMP have generously paired each of us with a mentor, one of their team of experts, so that we are supported in the months between the two halves of the course – an invaluable resource which I intend to make full use of. I’m now very much looking forward to diving into second instalment of the course come February, in particular attending an exclusive evening with Jamie Fobert over supper at the Tate!

– Elisa Harris, Krowji Studio Manager

To find out more about the Firm Foundation programme click here

Pool School Gallery celebrates National Lottery Funding

Photograph from left to right shows Pool Academy students, Leah Matthews, Harry Kessell and Leia Knight

Pool School Gallery, a community interest company, has been awarded £45,400 by the National Lottery to work with the Cornwall Council Schools Art Collection. This important and culturally significant collection was created with the intention that children in Cornwall should have access to great art. Artists represented include Jacob Epstein, Barbara Hepworth, Alfred Wallis and Terry Frost.

During 2018 Pool Academy students worked with artists to transform the school’s old caretakers’ bungalow into a new art gallery. Thanks to National Lottery players, the grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) will support an exciting project using the Cornwall Council Schools Art CollectionStudents will research its history and create exhibitions and learning materials based around it. The project examines not what art means, but what art means to us. Students will be responsible for telling its story and they will help to shape and secure its future. The project is supported by Pool Academy, The Royal Cornwall Museum, Cornwall Museums Partnership and Cornwall Council.

Claire Meakin, Pool Academy’s Principal, says: ‘I am really proud that our students are working with this culturally significant collection.’

The Chair of Governors at Pool Academy, Clive Bramley, says: ‘We are very grateful to the National Lottery for awarding us the grant.’

 Ian Wall, Director of the Royal Cornwall Museum, says: This initiative, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, is a great example of partnerships coming together to nurture the creative talent of young people’.

 Emmie Kell, CEO of Cornwall Museums Partnership says: ‘We are delighted to support this project as it completely aligns with our values of collaboration, innovation, and inclusivity. We look forward to seeing students realise their creative potential through the range of projects the gallery will enable them to be involved in.’

 Nerys Watts, Head of HLF South West, said: ‘Thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, this project will put Pool Academy students at the heart of telling the history of Cornwall’s Schools Art Collection and the cultural heritage it has built for them to explore and enjoy!’

 Cllr Bob Egerton, Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy at Cornwall Council says: ‘Cornwall Council is thrilled to see this innovative project getting underway. The purpose of the Council’s Schools Art Collection has always been to bring great quality art into the heart of our schools and this project achieves exactly that. It will give students the time to study the artworks more intensively and to be inspired to make their own creative and critical responses. The students will also develop a series of exhibitions and activities that will enable the local community and other schools to appreciate the works. We very much look forward to seeing the new approaches to working with the Collection that the students will develop.’

EB Year 7 says: I think it’s important to work with the Cornwall Council Schools Art Collection because it’s a great experience to go to the gallery, enjoy making things for it, and being able to come back and look at the work you’ve created and what you’ve achieved. I think that they (artists) are inspiring children to achieve what they want to achieve. Let’s say an artist showed some children his or her work, then the children might want to create something like that.