Board Development: Succession Planning

By now you know how much I love a sporting analogy. So it should come as no surprise that I’m going to use another one here to look at why being strategic about your board development and succession plan will help your organisation to deliver greater impact and focus resources more effectively.

After England won the Rugby World Cup in 2003 a lot of the experienced squad retired, and we had a hiatus of about ten years when frankly we weren’t that great. Mike Catt, one of that winning squad summed it up, “There was no legacy from our win. We didn’t pass anything on.” This has often confused me with British sports, why’d we get so good and then suddenly after a great achievement we’d seem to have to begin all over again.

I asked a friend of mine, a professional rugby player, why this was. His answer was succession planning. Well, his answer was a bit longer than that, but that was a large part of it. He used the example of the All Blacks, a team that has dominated the game for decades, they are the most successful sports franchise in history.

Museums and other charities can learn a lot from how the All Blacks, and other great sporting teams evolve and develop, continually striving to be better and do better.

 

“We always want to make sure that the place we go to, we leave it in as good if not better shape than when we arrived.”

– Sam Whitelock, City AM 2015

The All Blacks have a clear culture and values that they embed in every player, from the grassroots to the elite and all the support staff of coaches, trainers, in fact everyone involved in the game. ‘Better people make better All Blacks’ is the mantra that underpins the team’s culture.

Steve Tew, CEO of New Zealand Rugby says, “You have to live those values and live them 24/7 otherwise they end up being just words on a strategic plan or brand poster or some other fancy document.” They unite behind a shared vision of what success looks like.

The All Blacks never lose sight of who they are playing for: family, friends, their team mates and every single Kiwi scattered across the world. This is a lesson for every charity, to keep your stakeholders at the heart of everything that you do.

The All Blacks train relentlessly, elite players constantly hone the fundamental basic skills of their game, continually improving. An All Black would never consider they have nothing left to learn or suggest that they have all the necessary skills to deliver the best they can. The All Blacks have as high expectations of themselves as their fans do. Resting on their laurels is not an option.

To learn more about effective board development, please see our Governance eLearning modules (coming soon) or get in touch with us about our Good Governance programme by emailing clare@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk.

– Clare Pennington, RPR Programme Manager

My Experience of Firm Foundations – Elisa Harris

Presentation by CMP CEO Emmie Kell

The invitation to go on the Firm Foundations course came at the perfect time for me. Krowji had secured the match funding for Phase 2 of our redevelopment project and we were waiting for news of our ERDF bid – we have since been told it was successful!

The course is true to its name – designed to enable you to create a solid foundation before embarking on a capital project, there was a huge amount packed into just two days with a good balance of talks, site visits and tasks making it very engaging. During the first half of the course we were given direct access to an impressive list of experts covering everything from board structure to funding and marketing to risk management.

Highlights for me included a talk by Eden’s CEO Gordon Seabright, in which he spoke very candidly about the successes and challenges he’s faced during his time at Eden, and an informal surgery with Phil Gendall of Wolf Rock focussed on creating a clear message in your marketing materials. The risk assessment of preparing and eating a cream tea was also a lot of fun!

Firm Foundations has been designed for small groups of delegates in order to create an open, honest and safe environment in which to share experiences and ask questions. It’s relevant to all levels so there’s a good mix of people who have worked on capital projects and those who have never done anything like this before.

CMP have generously paired each of us with a mentor, one of their team of experts, so that we are supported in the months between the two halves of the course – an invaluable resource which I intend to make full use of. I’m now very much looking forward to diving into second instalment of the course come February, in particular attending an exclusive evening with Jamie Fobert over supper at the Tate!

– Elisa Harris, Krowji Studio Manager

To find out more about the Firm Foundation programme click here

Pool School Gallery celebrates National Lottery Funding

Photograph from left to right shows Pool Academy students, Leah Matthews, Harry Kessell and Leia Knight

Pool School Gallery, a community interest company, has been awarded £45,400 by the National Lottery to work with the Cornwall Council Schools Art Collection. This important and culturally significant collection was created with the intention that children in Cornwall should have access to great art. Artists represented include Jacob Epstein, Barbara Hepworth, Alfred Wallis and Terry Frost.

During 2018 Pool Academy students worked with artists to transform the school’s old caretakers’ bungalow into a new art gallery. Thanks to National Lottery players, the grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) will support an exciting project using the Cornwall Council Schools Art CollectionStudents will research its history and create exhibitions and learning materials based around it. The project examines not what art means, but what art means to us. Students will be responsible for telling its story and they will help to shape and secure its future. The project is supported by Pool Academy, The Royal Cornwall Museum, Cornwall Museums Partnership and Cornwall Council.

Claire Meakin, Pool Academy’s Principal, says: ‘I am really proud that our students are working with this culturally significant collection.’

The Chair of Governors at Pool Academy, Clive Bramley, says: ‘We are very grateful to the National Lottery for awarding us the grant.’

 Ian Wall, Director of the Royal Cornwall Museum, says: This initiative, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, is a great example of partnerships coming together to nurture the creative talent of young people’.

 Emmie Kell, CEO of Cornwall Museums Partnership says: ‘We are delighted to support this project as it completely aligns with our values of collaboration, innovation, and inclusivity. We look forward to seeing students realise their creative potential through the range of projects the gallery will enable them to be involved in.’

 Nerys Watts, Head of HLF South West, said: ‘Thanks to money raised by National Lottery players, this project will put Pool Academy students at the heart of telling the history of Cornwall’s Schools Art Collection and the cultural heritage it has built for them to explore and enjoy!’

 Cllr Bob Egerton, Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy at Cornwall Council says: ‘Cornwall Council is thrilled to see this innovative project getting underway. The purpose of the Council’s Schools Art Collection has always been to bring great quality art into the heart of our schools and this project achieves exactly that. It will give students the time to study the artworks more intensively and to be inspired to make their own creative and critical responses. The students will also develop a series of exhibitions and activities that will enable the local community and other schools to appreciate the works. We very much look forward to seeing the new approaches to working with the Collection that the students will develop.’

EB Year 7 says: I think it’s important to work with the Cornwall Council Schools Art Collection because it’s a great experience to go to the gallery, enjoy making things for it, and being able to come back and look at the work you’ve created and what you’ve achieved. I think that they (artists) are inspiring children to achieve what they want to achieve. Let’s say an artist showed some children his or her work, then the children might want to create something like that.

Spotlight on: Si Durrant, Trainee Curator at Wheal Martyn Clay Works

We catch up with Si Durrant at Wheal Martyn, one of the Trainee Curators supported by Cornwall Museums Partnership’s NPO programme, to talk about his showcase ‘Clay Stories: unearthing stories from our villages and towns’.

“I am now halfway through my placement as Wheal Martyn’s Trainee Curator. My role at Wheal Martyn primarily involves assisting Jo (Curator) and Nikita (Exhibition and Engagement Officer) with unlocking stories from the collection and archives held at Wheal Martyn. As a Trainee Curator, I have been gaining valuable on-the-job experience and attending training sessions at partner museums across Cornwall. I have already seen great variety in the role of a museum Curator. This has included an introduction to museum accreditation, health and safety training, record keeping, working with schools, collections handling, collections hazards, digitising negatives and, more recently, combining these new skills to curate my first ever showcase exhibition.”

“‘Clay Stories: unearthing stories from our villages and towns’, features a selection of curios from the St. Austell china clay area, with each display telling a unique community story from the last 200 years. Village shops, sports, housing, clothing, forgotten trades, industry, and the impact of two World Wars are represented in the extensive collection.”

“The theme of the showcase is stories from our villages and towns. The majority of our collection focuses on the industrial heritage of the china clay industry; however, buried within these c.10,000 items are certain objects that hold hidden stories about a specific area of the local community. For example, our Rolls Royce figurine and mould represents the relationship between the village of St. Dennis and the Aerospace Industry. In fact, this item has just been nominated for an award – Cornish Object of the Year 2019.”

“My research for the showcase began with a map of the St. Austell china clay district – an area which is bounded by St. Austell Bay in the south and the A390 to the north. This map revealed over 50 villages and hamlets that were in close proximity to clay workings. Once I had a list of villages, I was able to search our onsite database for relevant objects, documents, photographs and film. Over the course of several weeks I was able to shortlist these items and then research the stories behind them. Finally, these stories were condensed into a display in the museum atrium and weekly social media posts.”

“I have really enjoyed the huge variety this internship has offered me and greatly look forward to the next three months.”

Colin Vallance, Director of Wheal Martyn says, “It’s been fantastic to have Si as part of the team, uncovering some of the many stories that are hidden within our museum collection and sharing these with our local communities and visitors. Si’s internship is part funded by the European Social Fund, Arts Council England and Cornwall Council, as part of a Cornwall Museums Partnership NPO programme and we are very grateful for their support.”

‘Clay Stories: unearthing stories from our villages and towns’ is free to enter and runs until the end of February 2019. The showcase coincides with Wheal Martyn’s Cornwall Residents’ Pass Offer; for 12 months, admission passes are available at a reduced price of just £6.50 for an adult ticket.

Wheal Martyn would like to encourage visitors during January and February to discover some of these fascinating stories linked to local villages and towns. If you are inspired to share stories from your own village, pop into the museum, email info@wheal-martyn.com or share them on Facebook (@whealmartyncw).

For more information about the Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019 and to vote click here.

Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019 Vlog – Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery

Hi, I’m Peter the new Marketing and Events Intern at Cornwall Museums Partnership.

Part of my role at CMP is to help deliver events including the Cornwall Heritage Awards in March. The Cornwall Heritage Awards is a fantastic opportunity for museums and heritage organisations to showcase some of the amazing work they are doing, and this year the Cornish Object of the Year Award has been opened up to the public so everybody can have their say.

One of the great aspects of my internship is visiting the different museums in Cornwall, both big and small, and speaking to the staff and volunteers. Over the upcoming weeks I will be visiting each of the shortlisted objects and finding out from the staff and volunteers about the amazing stories behind the objects and why they were nominated.

In this first vlog, I visit Murdoch House in Redruth to hear about the story behind the Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery. Murdoch House was originally the residence of inventor William Murdoch and was the first house in the world to have gas lighting. Murdoch House is now home to the Cornish Global Migration Programme, and it is their director Mike who nominated the object for Cornish Object of the Year Award 2019.

The next vlog will feature the ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ hood ornament and mould, nominated by Wheal Martyn Clay Works.

– Peter Lower, Marketing and Events Intern

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House

During the ‘Great Cornish Diaspora’, many Cornish went to follow the lure of riches in gold rushes internationally, which offered opportunities and developed a tradition of sending home remittances – money made from their endeavours desperately needed to support extended families in Cornwall. The more successful migrants also sent home artefacts, especially jewellery.

The ‘Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery’ became a symbol of this separation and connection, perhaps sent to a mother, wife, or more likely a sweetheart. The most familiar of this jewellery found in Cornwall, is perhaps the pick and shovel gold brooch from the mines of South Africa. Such jewellery, in different styles, is found in other countries.

The Cornish Global Migration Programme at Murdoch House, Redruth says, ‘Our object is a beautifully presented brooch which is little over 4cm in length and features a shovel with a pick and dangling bucket joined together by a coiled gold rope. At the end of the pick and shovel there are gold nuggets. ‘South Africa’ is fashioned on the shovel and ‘8ct’ on the reverse. The original green velvet box has the jewellers’ name “W. Rode, Pritchard St., Johannesburg”. The item can perhaps be dated between 1890 – 1910.

Shortlisting judge Mark Trevethan said, ‘This is a very personal object that shows the reach of the Cornish yet the continued attachment to home and that mining tools were seen as attractive objects.’

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

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St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

This is the original clock hand made of copper, which was used on the clock face on the tower of St Mary’s Church in East Looe. This church, which dates from the 13th Century, is a well-known landmark just a few metres from the beach.

The one-handed clock was presented to the church in 1737 by Henry Trelawney with the engraving, ‘The gift of the Hon. Edward Trelawney, the Bond Major 1737.’

The clock was made by John Belling of Bodmin. It was a turret clock and he only made two such clocks as most clocks by this period were two-handed ones.

In 1996, the clock was restored but the original copper clock hand was kept in the museum where it can be viewed.

The Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol says, ‘We feel this object is of special interest as it’s rare to find a single clock hand. Secondly,  it has a direct link to the famous Trelawney family. Also, the Belling family later went into making domestic goods such as the “Baby Belling” cooker.’

Shortlisting judge Mark Trevethan said this was a, ‘Deceptively simple object that is unusual and rooted in several aspects of Cornish history and industry.’

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

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Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

If Penzance’s 1000 year-old market cross could talk, it would tell some very interesting stories. It currently sits outside Penlee House in what is now its seventh location in the town. It is 7ft tall, weighs almost a ton, and was carved from a single slab of local granite – possibly from nearby Madron Carn.

In earlier times, the cross had some inscriptions on all four sides, but centuries of weathering and erosion mean that these designs are now hard to make out. Experts have different ideas about what the inscriptions mean. Professor Charles Thomas suggests that the inscription on the back of the cross reads ‘Procumbent in foris – Quicumque pace venit hic’ meaning ‘They lie here in the open whosoever comes hither in peace, let him pray for their souls.’

The inscription on the cross means that historians believe the cross originally stood in an enclosed cemetery close in Alverton, but later had several prominent locations in Penzance. Its original location is listed as Parkeancrowse (which means ‘the enclosed field of the cross’ in Cornish) in 1560 and 1589. The inscription on the edge has been read as ‘Regis ricati crux’ – ‘Cross of King Ricatus’. There is an image of a man with a very sad face, who is attributed as possibly being King Ricatus, who was thought to be a possible 11th Century Cornish King.

In the early 1800s, the cross was moved to the Greenmarket and again twice more, until it was taken to the Market house at the top of Market Jew Street. Later it was moved to Morrab Gardens in 1899 and then to Penlee Park in 1953, moving to its present location outside Penlee House in 1997.

Penlee House Gallery and Museum says, ‘Imagine all the different things the cross has seen, from its early mediaeval origins on the edge of a burial ground; the attack on Penzance, Newlyn, and Mousehole by a Spanish raid in 1595, a young Humphry Davy might have walked past it at the turn of the 19th Century; it would have withstood the bombing of Penzance during the Second World War and have been walked past by millions of people over its 1000 year history.’

Shortlisting judge Mark Trevethan, Cornish Language Lead at Cornwall Council, said it was, ‘A cross with its own personal history – but also representative of all the stone crosses in Cornwall and their changing role.’

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

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The Gurney Stove – The Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Gurney Stove was an early type of radiator, which was invented by Cornishman Sir Goldsworthy Gurney. It was one of his most successful inventions.

The stove was unique as it rested in a trough of water, which transmitted heat as it evaporated. Another pioneering feature was the 24 cast iron fins that surrounded the stove, which further improved its performance. It is likely that Gurney’s design was the forerunner of the modern radiator.

The stove was installed into 22 cathedrals, including St Pauls and over 10,000 churches, schools, and government buildings across the country. There are still some working examples, that have been converted to gas, at Chester, Hereford and Tewksbury.

The Castle Heritage Centre says, ‘The fact that the stove was at the cutting edge of Victorian heating engineering and there are still examples in use today, demonstrates Goldsworthy Gurney’s genius. A true Cornishman, whose inventions were more often than not ahead of their time and still make an impact in modern Britain.’

Judge Mark Trevethan, Cornish Language Lead at Cornwall Council, said this is an ‘intriguing object that shows Cornish inventiveness and impact of Cornwall on the wider world.’

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

This poll is no longer accepting votes

 

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

Developed in Cornwall in the 1930s, Molochite, from which the mould is constructed, is a clay product used in investment casting. This casting process relies on a wax pattern coated in a heat-resistant clay, which forms a mould for molten metals. The wax pattern is ‘invested’ when the clay mould is fired and the wax melts. Molten metal is poured into the clay mould and a cast metal piece results. Investment casting permits the formation of very intricate and complex shapes.

Whilst this example is a hood ornament, Rolls Royce use this clay in large quantities to cast turbine blades for jet engines. These heat-resistant clays, known as refractory materials, are able to withstand the high temperatures of molten metals, such as the nickel super alloys used to make turbine blades. Molochite is also used to line blast furnaces for the steel industry and in the distinctive black basalt ware produced by Wedgwood Potteries.

The ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ hood ornament has adorned Rolls Royce cars since the 1920s and is said to represent a secret love affair between John Walter, second Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, and the model for the emblem – his secretary Eleanor Velasco Thornton. Two people from opposite ends of the socio-economic spectrum.

The mould and figurine once took pride of place in a trophy cabinet at John Keay House, former headquarters of English China Clays International (today Cornwall College, St Austell). When the company was sold in 1999, these items made their way to Wheal Martyn.

Molochite is still produced today at the Parkandillick site, just southwest of St Dennis, and Rolls Royce is still a customer.

Wheal Martyn says, ‘The ‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ hood ornament and mould represents the enduring relationship between Cornish clay and the aerospace industry. From the 1950s to the present day, Rolls Royce would become one of the China clay industry’s most prestigious customers.’

Shortlisting judge, Mark Trevethan Cornish Language Lead for Cornwall Council said, ‘This is a quirky object reflecting the quiet global impact of one of Cornwall’s key but little-known about industries’.

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

This poll is no longer accepting votes

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

This pasty was carved from stone by William (Bill) Jewell in Bethlehem in 1943 when he was feeling homesick for Cornwall. It was then kept safe as a memory of international travels.

Bill was a butcher and enlisted in 1941 to the Royal Scots Greys, part of the ‘Desert Rats’. In 1942 the Scots Greys moved from Syria to Egypt, and remained there until the end of the North Africa Campaign. At some point before the Scots Greys were redeployed to Italy, Bill must have visited Bethlehem.

The Scots Greys returned home in 1944 before taking part in the Normandy Landing. Bill ended his service in Germany on 21 April 1946 with a note of ‘exemplary military conduct’, having also been ‘a butcher with responsibility for the ration store’. On his return, he worked again as butch in Helston where he lived until he died in his 90s.

Bill kept his handmade memento all his life, and his family then chose to give the pasty along with photos, medals, and archive documents, to the museum. This little pasty was a memory of home, adventures, and full tummies at a time of shortage.

The Museum of Cornish Life, Helston, says, ‘We love the little pasty which is plain and understated. It is an expression of what was important to a Cornish soldier very far from home in a very unreal situation. He went from being a butcher to tank battles in the desert. This pasty is no ‘tacky gift’ – it is both a remembrance of home and of people now gone. It is funny to think of Bill sitting in the heat carving a pasty from a bit of stone he picked up in Bethlehem, which was a small village at the time. Maybe it made him laugh that the translation of Bethlehem is ‘House of Meat’. What we do know is that this pocket-sized pasty journeyed safely with Bill from Bethlehem to Helston and was treasure all his life.’

Shortlisting judge Mark Trevethan said this object was ‘A pasty with a story that reflects Cornish exploration and participation in the wider world but continued strong attachment to custom and roots.’

Find out more about the other shortlisted objects here or click on a specific object below.

The Gurney Stove – Castle Heritage Centre, Bude

The Bethlehem Pasty – Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

St Mary’s Church Clock Hand – Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol, Looe

Cornish Miner’s Sweetheart Jewellery – Murdoch House, Redruth

Penzance Market Cross – Penlee House Gallery and Museum

‘Spirit of Ecstasy’ Hood Ornament and Mould – Wheal Martyn

This poll is no longer accepting votes