Freelance Early Years Facilitator – Minnows Explorers

national maritime museum

National Maritime Museum Cornwall

We wish to appoint a suitable individual to work as a Freelance Early Years Facilitator to help the Museum expand our successful early years ‘Minnows’ programme.

With funding and support from Nesta and the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, together in partnership with the Eden Project, we will be launching a new exciting session, Minnows Explorers. Working with the NMMC Learning Team, the Early Years Facilitator will help to develop, plan and deliver a pioneering new programme of activities aimed at grandparents and their grandchildren.

This new session is due to start at the beginning of October 2019 and will run until mid-July 2020. It will therefore be important for the appointee to be able to commit to the entire duration of the programme and work flexibly in order to meet external deadlines.

The new sessions will be designed to help grandparents who regularly look after their under-fives to play and learn together by exploring the Museum involving storytelling, games and craft activities.

There will be a total of 33 Minnows Explorers sessions, delivered every Thursday afternoon from 1.00pm-2.30pm. The Facilitator will be expected to organise the setting up and taking down of these sessions, covering a four hour period incorporating the delivery of the session, for which you will be paid £80.00.

In addition we anticipate there will be 12 days for development and training, for which you will be paid £140.00 per day. Travel expenses for off-site training will be paid.

The Facilitator will contribute to the development and planning of high-quality weekly activity sessions and resources designed to engage a diverse intergenerational audience, working in consultation with the NMMC Learning Team.

Ideally you will have at least an NVQ3 or NNEB qualification (or equivalent) in Early Years and Childcare, with a good understanding of the Early Years Foundation Stage. You will have previous experience of working with children aged 18 months to 5 years of age and the ability to develop activities and resources which are fun and enjoyable for the under-fives. A DBS certificate will be required for this role (the cost of which will be covered by the Museum if you do not have one).

A full brief for this freelance position can be found here.

If you are interested in applying for this freelance position, please send your current CV, detailing your skills and experience, to lindafrost@nmmc.co.uk or send to Linda Frost, Human Resources Manager, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, Discovery Quay, Falmouth, TR11 3QY

The closing date: Monday, 9 September 2019 at 9.00am
Interviews: Thursday, 12 September 2019

Bright Sparks of 2018

Cornwall Museums Partnership and FEAST are challenging museums and artists to work together to generate original ideas for bringing more and different people into the museums of Cornwall to enjoy Cornwall’s unique heritage. For the third year, we are offering a joint small grants fund to enable the best ideas to be tested and delivered.

To get a better idea of the diverse range of projects that have enjoyed Bright Sparks support, here are the museums and artists who were successful last year.

Isles of Scilly Student Publication

The Islands’ Partnership worked with the Isles of Scilly Museum and the Five Islands Academy to produce a publication for visitors using selected artefacts as a starting point to explore local history.

Students visited the museum and interviewed local trustees and experts to investigate the islands’ rich heritage and changing fortunes over the past four thousand years.

The resulting guide for visiting families includes a young persons’ perspective on Scilly’s past, reflections on growing up on Cornwall’s islands and suggested activities linked to local culture and heritage.

Wish You Were Here

‘Wish You Were Here’ took as its starting point the idea of providing a winter escape for the residents of two nursing homes in Helston and the Lizard.

Helston Museum worked with artist Susanna Webster, who brought to the project her creativity and experience working with residents in care homes, memory cafes and community settings in Cornwall. Together they designed a series of virtual visits to the museum using FaceTime. On these visits the residents were able to explore the museum and build relationships with the staff and volunteers without needing to travel.

This project allowed visitors who wouldn’t normally enjoy the museum to do so, and as a result of taking part, the nursing home residents became more comfortable using FaceTime and Skype to communicate with their own families. The museum purchased an iPad which they continue to use to help visitors engage with their collection.

The Looe Diehards

This project focussed on a little-known period in Looe’s history, the establishment in 1803 of the East and West Looe Volunteer Artillery during the Napoleonic era. The project wanted to remember this difficult time when the towns were despoiled of its trade by the threat of war and how the community came together.

The Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol worked with Sue Field, a local maker, community artist, and storyteller to help bring this story to life through the interplay of puppets as exhibits and animated characters. Archive material was used to write the stories of the Looe Diehard men, exquisite puppets of Captain Thomas Bond and Fisherman volunteer Pengelly were hand crafted and the museum’s team of volunteers were trained in their operation.

Building audiences and providing engaging and meaningful interactions is essential for the future of the museum and its collections. Through projects like this, The Old Guildhall Museum and Gaol can continue to promote and engage people with their local heritage.

Redefining the Museum Label: New Voices

Falmouth Art Gallery has been working with artist Felicity Tattersall, whose drawing practice is inspired by hidden narratives in museums and archives, and Curator Charlotte Davis to deliver this exciting public engagement project.

A variety of community groups have been given the opportunity to learn about the function and use of museum labels. During these workshops they have been invited to create their own imaginative and experimental museum labels using unusual materials, creative writing, drawing and digital media. This project is about rethinking how people from the local community connect with the work that is in the Gallery.

The project will culminate in a public exhibition at Falmouth Art Gallery, a shared learning digital event and an open call for everyone to come and create their own label for a piece in the collection.

Remembering People from the Past

This is a collaborative project between Lostwithiel Museum and creative researcher Amanda Davidge, using the museum archives and collection to discover more about lives of important people from Lostwithiel’s past.

To begin with the team decided to research the fascinating life of Frances Hext (1819-1896) who had lived in the town and written a book Memorials of Lostwithiel (and of Restormell):collected and contributed. Amanda ran workshops with the museum volunteers to create assemblage memory boxes, family trees and journals to illustrate her life in a large display.

Following this, family history workshops will be offered to the wider community who wish to investigate the town’s history as well as their personal family history and create their own ‘story boxes’.

Apply Today

We are looking for genuine innovation and collaboration between the artist(s) and museum, and for ideas which would appeal to a broad range of the community. We are inviting proposals for creative projects which spark interest in what museums have to offer: we want more people interested in their heritage and more people doing or experiencing something creative.

We are offering a number of small grants of up to £2,500. The project must involve some form of tangible activity or event with which the community can get involved.

Selection of successful projects will be made by a panel of FEAST and Cornwall Museum Partnership directors and a member of each organisation’ s board or advisory group.  The deadline for applications is 16th September 2019 and decisions will be announced shortly afterwards.

To apply, please download and complete the application form below.

For more information contact celine@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk  Tel: 01209500750 or  Emma Leaper feast@creativekernow.org.uk   Tel: 01209312502.

 

– Emma Leaper

FEAST Programme Administrator

Tender Opportunity – wAVE PR and Marketing

Background

The Coastal Communities wAVE project will support five coastal communities to deliver economic diversification and innovation. Through the creation of virtual, augmented, and immersive heritage experiences, and the implementation of local engagement activities, these communities will gain access to new, year-round, higher value tourist markets.

The project will enable research experts and technologists to come together with local communities to take visitors on a compelling immersive and interactive journey to the past. This will present new opportunities for year-round international and domestic tourism while also celebrating Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly’s rich and distinctive heritage. The initiative will provide a blueprint for digitally enhancing visitor experiences, designed to increase visitor numbers, thereby breathing new life into the five participating coastal economies in a way that can be replicated across the coastal communities of the UK.

The technology will be developed by Falmouth University in partnership with Cornwall Museums Partnership; Telegraph Museum Porthcurno; Castle Heritage Centre, Bude; St Agnes Museum; Isles of Scilly and the Old Guildhall Museum & Gaol, Looe.

After an extensive period of consultation, development, community engagement and testing, the technology will be launched in a phased manner in each of the five museums. The project launched in April 2019, with the first experience now due to be launched in January 2020.

Objectives

The wAVE project objectives are to:

1) Co-develop in partnership with five participating local communities virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiences within site-specific museum spaces located on the coast of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly

2) Interpret the participating museums’ assets and/or local areas’ cultural heritage in new ways that provide visitors with an enjoyable, contemporary and inclusive virtual experience

3) Increase footfall to the participating museums by 24,825 and therefore strengthen the visitor and heritage economy in five coastal communities across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly

4) Strengthen knowledge-sharing and digital skills development across Cornwall to help future-proof the visitor economy and to develop a blueprint for replication across the UK

The project will be delivered via three strands:

1) Digital Revival: Each museum and local community will work with Falmouth University’s research experts to develop and implement innovative technologies to create new, immersive visitor experiences. VR headsets, HD projection techniques and Computer-Generated Imagery (CGI) will bring museum artefacts and local heritage (including that which is largely inaccessible, e.g. shipwrecks) to life. Visitors will meet exciting historical
figures, explore heritage sites, see ancient artefacts and extinct sea creatures in their original settings or be propelled into the depths of the ocean on a sunken wreck. 360° films will be created and disseminated through online media platforms e.g. Visit Cornwall, and via international tour operators to presell these highly interactive experiences. This will enable the UK to exploit emerging global tourism markets through cutting-edge immersive marketing.

2) Human-Centred Design: wAVE will engage participating museum staff, volunteers and their local communities, through a targeted co-design programme. This will ensure a high degree of involvement and buy-in from local people and ensure that our products are informed by their knowledge of the needs and desires of key target markets.

3) Impact and Legacy: wAVE will involve local communities in a programme of digital training to ensure that the opportunity presented by immersive technology is seized by a wider number of tourism businesses. A core component of the project is to ensure that local people are able to add value to their businesses through better access to and understanding of their local heritage and by developing the skills and networks to benefit from immersive experiences developed through the project. wAVE is designed to help coastal tourism businesses future-proof their offer, by helping them to differentiate their product, make their businesses more visible and access new virtual experiences which they can share with their partners and use to entice new visitors.

Budget

£10,000 in Y1, rising to £25,000 in Y2

Target Market

wAVE spans the Gen Y and Millennial age groups who have high service expectations, which include a dependency on, and access to, innovative technology. wAVE responds to their preference for unique experiences and their interest in learning about and experiencing other cultures. There are two predominant target audiences for wAVE:

1) Primary Focus

– Visitors from Emerging Markets

– Younger, tech savvy tourists from USA and Northern Europe

– Communications strategy with targeted social media advertising, key travel review sites e.g. Trip Advisor, and other popular online destinations such as Secret Escapes, AirBnB Experiences, and Trivago

2) Community Engagement Groups

– To be engaged at each of the five locations, to include at least 290 private businesses

– Local creative, heritage and tourism businesses, organisations and individuals brought together for the benefit of the local economy

– This approach to community engagement is a core aspect of the project’s business model as it will ensure local buy-in and local ownership from the outset

– It will also introduce a cross section of the community to the potential of immersive tech and build strong local networks
We will need support from the appointed agency to bring insight into the particular needs of the identified target groups and beneficiaries.

Stakeholders

The successful agency will be reporting to Amy Shakespeare, wAVE Community Project Manager at Cornwall Museums Partnership. Amy has overall responsibility for the delivery of the project, including the Marketing and PR activities.

The project is led by the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership, with Cornwall Museums Partnership and Falmouth University. The five museums involved are Telegraph Museum Porthcurno; Castle Heritage Centre, Bude; St Agnes Museum; Isles of Scilly and the Old Guildhall Museum & Gaol, Looe.

Mandatory

Immersive Visualisation Options

360° tours of the museums and heritage landscapes (which Falmouth University can create) will be available to help travellers become acquainted with a part of the UK that they are not already familiar with.

Digital Access to Community Events

We have a commitment to provide digital access to the community events and training which will be run as part of the project.

The Brief

We are looking for an experienced agency that can bring insights into the particular needs of the identified target groups and beneficiaries.

– Develop and manage marketing activities including development of a detailed Marketing and Communications Strategy informed by the latest tourism data, identifying activities and outcomes at a local, national, and international level with communications tailored to the target audiences

– Strategy to include at minimum – targeted advertising on social media, key travel review sites including Trip Advisor and other popular online destinations such as Secret Escapes, AirBnB Experiences and Trivago that are accessed by younger tech savvy tourists

– Management of marketing and communications activity

Selection Process

Proposals will be assessed on the following criteria:

– Understanding of the brief

– Understanding of our target audiences

– Experience of agency

– Creativity and quality of proposal

Please submit your proposal including a breakdown of costs by 5pm on Friday 30 August 2019 to amy@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk

Any questions please get in touch with Amy Shakespeare, wAVE Community Project Manager on 01209 500750 or amy@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk

Digital Project Administrator Apprentice

The featured image for the wAVE page is a woman viewing a museum through a tablet.

The successful candidate will be joining our small and supportive team based at Krowji in Redruth working on the wAVE Immersive Experiences Project.

You will be working primarily alongside the wAVE Community Project Manager to undertake a wide range of duties including:

– Collating and sending out the project newsletter
– Providing content to the CMP Marketing and Impact Officer to promote the wAVE project
– Planning and running events
– Updating and managing digital project management tools including Google Drive and Trello
– Organising and booking meetings with project partners
– Recording and sharing meeting agendas and action points
– Supporting the Project Manager with reporting, updating the risk register, raising invoices, and other project administration
– Maintaining project contacts and data within the CRM database
– Undertaking any other work as requested by the project team

You will be expected to manage your own workload so an organised person with good attention to detail would do well. This role will allow you to develop and grow with excellent support from our team. There are opportunities to attend additional training courses or events to learn more about Cornwall’s cultural and heritage sector to further develop your talents.

Working week
Monday – Friday: 9:00am – 5:30pm with an unpaid hour for lunch.
Total hours per week: 37.50

Expected duration

18 months

Rate of pay

£8.21 per hour

Possible start date
30 Sep 2019

Apprenticeship level
Advanced Level Apprenticeship

For more details and to apply, please email info@cornwallmuseumspartnership.org.uk or head to the website www.findapprenticeship.service.gov.uk/apprenticeship/-457844 

Pride at The Royal Cornwall Museum

Royal Cornwall Museum at Cornwall Pride 2018

The Royal Cornwall Museum Pride Project is a rolling programme which started in 2017. It strives to uncover neglected heritage stories of LGBTQ Cornwall and is an integral platform offering queer events across the Cornish community.

Evidence of sexuality and gender fluidity have often been neglected in history. This is not through lack of evidence in which diversity existed, but representative of how political views can shape the histories being communicated. As a result, queer stories were often ‘straightened out’ or smoothed over, which meant an open discussion of sexuality in history didn’t exist.

The Museums ongoing pride project began with attending Cornwall Pride in 2017. This was followed by a year-long research project into queer history in Cornwall, culminating in a BBC Radio Cornwall series where different queer figures from Cornish history were discussed in the run up to pride 2018.

Publicising these historical queer stories from Cornish history challenges the heteronormativity of historiography, as many of the historical stories discussed in the series are well known local people who have been detached from their queer identity, such as Daphne Du Maurier. It is vital to remember the importance of championing these stories and to offer them a platform of validating Cornish history as queer history, as prejudice is still prevalent in many forms today.

LGBTQ Pride attendees with Royal Cornwall Museum

At Cornwall Pride in 2018 we took along a video recorder and asked attendees why pride in Cornwall was important to them. This contemporary collecting created a snapshot of queer identity which has now been accessioned into the Museums’ permanent collections. This was a significant step for the Royal Cornwall Museum as previously, nothing in the collection (a collection of over 500,000 objects) had been noted as LGBTQ. Despite a 200-year long presence in Cornwall, 2018 was the first time an openly queer object was accessioned.

In 2019, the Museum will be promoting gender fluidity in Cornish History where it will be exploring the stories of Gluck, Samuel Foote, Marlow Moss and many more.

Some may see the museum’s presence at Cornwall Pride as unexpected. The RCM is the first Museum of its time, in Cornwall, to attend Cornwall Pride. Statements such as ‘I did not expect the Royal Cornwall Museum to be at Pride’ and ‘I didn’t think the Museum would be the kind of place to support us’ were often heardThis is exactly the sort of appearance the RCM and historical institutions across the UK are endeavouring to break free from; the National Trust took a big step in exploring queer stories associated with their properties and the V&A have LGBTQ tours of the galleries.

Museums are not intended to be a neutral space and are there to inform and be open to interpretation, acting for and with everyone. The Museum is working hard on celebrating diversity by actively expanding the programme to become more inclusive, and by working with community groups. The Royal Cornwall Museum’s Pride project sends a message of acceptance, it allows the museum to welcome everybody and allows people to interact with their heritage in a way they possibly couldn’t or wouldn’t have before.

Pride at Royal Cornwall Museum 

This August the Museum will host a week-long pride event featuring:

  • An evening with local drag act Roxie Moron on Wednesday 17 August.
  • A talk by Dan Vo, who founded the award-winning volunteer-led LGBTQ Tours at V&A, London and developed Bridging Binaries for University of Cambridge Museums. He works with museums and galleries to shine a light on objects which explore gender and sexual identities through a queer lens.

If you would like to get involved in the Museums Pride project, please apply to be a Citizen Curator with the Museum, as part of the programme will support the Pride project.

Read more on The Hidden Histories of Cornwall’s Queer Community here!

– Sophie Meyer
Marketing and Digital Lead, Royal Cornwall Museum

Spotlight on: Nikita Brown from Wheal Martyn Clay Works

In the latest installment of our ‘Spotlight on’ blog posts, we hear from Nikita Brown, Exhibition and Engagement Officer at Wheal Martyn Clay Works near St. Austell, about the importance of accessibility in museums.

I believe that museums should act as community hubs, where all members of the community feel confident and safe to voice their opinions and take ownership of the museum and its collections. Improving accessibility is one way I can ensure that all visitors feel welcome at Wheal Martyn and have a fantastic museum experience.

So, what have we been doing at Wheal Martyn?

As Exhibition and Engagement Officer, my first priority was to improve the overall access to the museum for a general visit. Making small changes to the museum has allowed staff to work with more community groups and enhance the visitor experience for those with additional needs, whether this is creating visual stories for people with autism and anxiety, or simply changing how a gate opens to make it more wheelchair accessible.

At Wheal Martyn we have been working with partner organisations to seek expert advice and ensure our accessible information is easy to use. We are fortunate to be one of around twenty heritage destinations taking part in Heritage Ability’s, Heritage Lottery Funded project, which looks to improve accessibility and inclusivity in historical sites. Working in partnership with Heritage Ability, the museum now has a new Easy Read Guide making the site’s information easy to understand for those with learning difficulties, as well as a digital British Sign Language (BSL) tour of the site which can be viewed on YouTube or via a tablet at the museum.

I also received training from Heritage Ability on disability and deaf awareness which I have been able to replicate with other museum staff. We are fortunate to have fantastic, friendly staff at Wheal Martyn who are always willing to go above and beyond to improve visitor’s experience. The training has equipped them with relevant knowledge about how best to help all visitors, regardless of disability or need. It also highlighted the benefits of making small adaptations, such as having hearing loops, which we purchased two of to go in the reception and café.

Becoming an autism-friendly museum

I’m passionate about making attractions and historical sites more autism-friendly, so this was another one of my top priorities when I started working at Wheal Martyn. I started by creating two visual stories of the museum. Visual stories use images and words to show visitors with autism the layout of the museum and what to expect before visiting. An example being how the café can sometimes be busy and have strong smells. Visual stories are really easy to do, so I would encourage all historical sites to give it a go. Once I had finished the visual stories, I then had them checked by Spectrum, who specialise in Autistic Spectrum Disorders, to make sure they were useful for this group of people. I would really recommend seeking expert opinion where possible, as their advice was incredibly helpful and even though I was often on the right lines, it was great to get this confirmed by professionals.

With guidance from Spectrum, I created a quiet space at Wheal Martyn with comfy sofas and bean bags to allow people an area to chill out, if the museum gets too overwhelming for them. Visitors with sensory disorders can also use our sensory backpack, which includes ear defenders, fiddle toys and a sensory game. It’s great to see these bags being used around the site and we have received a lot of positive feedback from our visitors who have enjoyed using them.

A picture of Wheal Martyn's autism-friendly sensory bag.

In March 2019, Wheal Martyn held its first relaxed opening session which allows families to explore the museum at a quieter pace. Although only a few families attended the first session, the impact the session had on one of the families was huge. It gave them the confidence to return to Wheal Martyn with their extended family during the Easter holidays, giving them an opportunity to enjoy being together as a family.  The relaxed sessions take place every quarter, with our next sessions taking place on Saturday 19 October and Saturday 18 January.

Encouraging social group meetings at the museum

With help from our fantastic, committed volunteers, we have started running two new social prescribing groups held at the museum. Arts and Craft for Health which runs every Tuesday morning and a Sensory Garden group which will launch in September. Both groups aim to give those struggling with mental illness or other long term health conditions, the opportunity to develop their confidence and skills in a safe and friendly environment.

The Arts and Craft group consists of participants bringing along their own craft which they would like to work on during the sessions and they have the option of asking the coordinator for help and advice. What I have personally enjoyed witnessing is the participants sharing their craft skills with each other. I am always amazed at how caring and supportive these groups are and I have definitely learned lots of new craft skills from the participants myself!

People taking park in Wheal Martyn's Arts and Crafts for Health group activities.

We have artists regularly holding specialised workshops with the participants, so they have the opportunity to learn a new skill and explore the museum in a new way. Recently, the group has taken part in a sound workshop with artist Justin Wiggan and have even made their own bricks with the Brickfields project (a Whitegold initiative). As Wheal Martyn has an extensive brick collection, it was great to explore these stories in a new way with the participants and everyone was pleased with their brick designs.

The impact the sessions have on the participants is clear to see; confidence is growing, friendships have been formed and the group is always filled with laughter and support for each other. One of the participants who hadn’t drawn since he was at school, has enjoyed the sessions so much, that he has started up his own group on a different day. We also have a Memory Café which meets every second Monday of the month for people suffering from memory loss and their carers. The group consists of a range of informal arts, crafts and reminiscence activities, as well as a nice chat and cuppa!

Looking to the future

Wheal Martyn has a lot more planned over the next few months. Whether it is working with the Sensory Trust to create a sensory map and bespoke workshops for children with additional needs, or trialing live streaming of events to make them more accessible for those who can’t get to the museum. Perhaps the most exciting has to be the opening of our new facilities in April 2020, as part of the Clay Works project which will include a new gallery for temporary exhibitions, a new learning and activity space and a new permanent exhibition on the ‘Transport of China Clay’. The new improvements will also include a lift to access the exhibition space, meaning that more areas of Wheal Martyn will become accessible for wheelchairs.

I aim to embed accessibility in all areas of my work which includes temporary exhibitions where I try to ensure that all senses are stimulated through having a range of different interactives. I think my main learning from the last year is the importance of working with partner organisations for help and advice. Everyone I have contacted has been happy to help and are incredibly passionate about making more sites accessible. If you would like any more information about the projects mentioned above, then I am more than happy to share my learning with other museums.

– Nikita Brown
Exhibition and Engagement Officer
, Wheal Martyn Clay Works
https://www.wheal-martyn.com/

My Experiences of Firm Foundations Part Two – Elisa Harris

Firm Foundations part two started at the beautiful Tate St Ives. It was great to catch up with everyone again after a three-month gap. The lightning talks in the morning were quite different from the first time around with everyone speaking much more confidently about their projects.

The morning session was focussed on planning permission and building regulations, with a really useful workshop run by representatives from Cornwall Council in which we were able to ask direct questions e.g. What counts as a non-material amendment? and What requires a resubmission to planning? This was followed by a sneak preview of the Anna Boghiguian show with Sara Matson, Senior Curator at Tate St. Ives, which was a rather special added bonus! 

In the afternoon the course covered procurement and value engineering and the day was topped off with a delicious evening meal in the Tate’s Clore Sky studio. We were privileged to be joined by Marketing Manager Arwen Fitch and Andy Bruton who chatted with us openly about their experience of the capital redevelopment – the highs, the lows and the lessons learned.

Andy Bruton talking at the February 2019 Firm Foundations programme

Andy Bruton giving a talk at Firm Foundations

Day 2 was held at Porthmeor Studios and this is where we got into the nitty-gritty of the construction process. It has to be said that by the afternoon we were all suffering a bit from information overload and it was helpful to be reminded that we don’t have to be experts in every field, the project manager you appoint is there to guide you through the process.

The final session was led by Chris Hibbert, Manager of the Borlase Smart John Wells Trust, who managed the £4 million renovation of Porthmeor Studios. He gave an inspirational talk and a tour of the studios which a great way of demonstrating how everything we’d learnt could be put into practice.

We were all a bit sad when the course came to an end but we’ve agreed to stay in touch and will be planning a reunion at Krowji towards the end of our Phase 2 redevelopment project, which is now underway!

You can find out more about the upcoming 2019/2020 Firm Foundations programme here.

 – Elisa Harris, Krowji Studio Manager
www.krowji.org.uk

Guest Blog: Citizen Curators Invited to Curate the Cornish National Collection

The Citizen Curators who undertake Cornwall Museums Partnership’s free introductory curatorial training and museum awareness course are being asked to collaboratively curate a collection distributed among our museums that reflects the diversity of Cornish society past and present. 

How?

The Citizen Curators, past and future, will improve our knowledge of new research and contribute to improved understanding of the significance of Cornish National Minority Status by:

  1. Undertaking new research and sharing an understanding of existing collections that have been under-utilised or forgotten, particularly in relation to poorly-represented people
  2. Identify a starting group of c.70 items from museum collections across Cornwall and by disseminating this knowledge through online platforms 
  3. Making recommendations for items which reflect Cornishness(es) that museums should collect today
  4. Supporting dialogue with audiences about the project, so that audiences are encouraged to contribute to debate and content.

Why National Collection? 

We are calling this a National Collection to directly reflect National Minority status recognised by the UK Government through the Council of Europe’s Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities in April 2014. The Framework Convention is also linked to the European Charter of Human Rights and therefore the recognition of those who self-identity as Cornish is a human right. This status and formal UK Government recognition will not be affected by Brexit as the Council of Europe is not part of the EU.

There are different understandings of nationality, nationhood and nation, many of them culturally informed, some of them politically-charged. We need to recognise the existence of all of these in our museums. The Cornish National Collection is intended to celebrate the national without straying into the nationalistic (wisdom spoken by Allison Fox, Curator at Manx National Heritage–the Isle of Man is a modern Celtic nation like Cornwall).

Even though Cornwall is not a nation-state, the corporate of Cornish people inside and outside Cornwall may be thought of as a nation on an equal basis as Scots, Irish, Welsh or Manx. National Minorities like the Cornish can transcend current state boundaries, e.g. the Sami of northern Scandinavia and parts of Russia. Although ethnicity is an important component of Cornish identity to some, National Minority status offers a much broader scope for self-identity that can relate to: birth, ancestry or shared cultural experience.

We are working out how best to represent this idea in Kernewek, the Cornish Language. It might be Argh Kenedhlek Kernow which means Cornwall’s National Ark.

Rationale

Across the ancient, military, social, natural, industrial, artistic and scientific heritage held in our collections are the hidden (and arguably the most important stories) relating to Cornwall’s cultural heritage, identities and impact upon the world. The Cornish were recognised as a National Minority by the UK Government in 2014 and Cornwall’s museums need to take a leading role in ensuring Cornwall’s cultural heritage is understood and shared in all of its diversity, milestones and controversies.

With unprecedented access to the historical collections of seven museums, the Citizen Curators will explore which objects of local, national and international significance might create a Cornish National Collection that is distributed across the consortia of museums and the communities they serve. They will research, examine and advance ideas around Cornish identity by asking new questions, presenting previously untold or under-examined stories and sharing the collection in new ways in the museum, outside the museum, and across digital channels.

Through their learning and development Citizen Curators will develop an approach to identifying the objects of a Cornish National Collection and explore how they might be interpreted through programming, exhibitions, outreach and online. They will propose areas of need for contemporary collecting, including the collection of digital artefacts. Previous cohorts will be part of this peer-to-peer process with wider staff, volunteers and users. 

Two of the Citizen Curators examining some of Penlee House Gallery and Museum's collection in the object handling session.

Achieving impact

Cornish identity and distinctiveness is a real and contemporary issue for communities in Cornwall today. Increasingly in Cornwall, discussions about Cornish identity are becoming politicised and extreme; outside Cornwall, Cornishness is usually dismissed as a joke or unheard of. 

There is a growing need for a more nuanced, relevant and balanced exploration of multiple Cornish identities. This is a space museums in Cornwall can fill.  Our museums are rooted within their communities. 

Re-examining the hidden, lost and forgotten objects with new eyes will enable greater recognition of Cornwall’s cultural heritage and its multiple dimensions. The programme will challenge the cohort to use their creativity within curatorial practice to explore new ways to interpret, share and support an inclusive dialogue with audiences in Cornwall about what Cornish minority status means to them.

It’s early days, we are viewing this curating project as more of a campaign than an end product as we do not know to where this will eventually lead.

Next steps

We are asking Citizen Curators and colleagues to:

  • Take part in the Cornish National Collection First Survey (August 2019)
  • Make a list of things you want to know more about in relation to Cornish identities
  • Identify themes and items from your projects that might be included 
  • Think about under-represented people, ideas and stories that we will curate
  • Identify types of artefacts outside museums collections that could be included, e.g. intangible heritage.

Keep in touch with developments

Dr. Tehmina Goskar of the Curatorial Research Centre will be overseeing the development of Argh Kenedhlek Kernow – Cornish National Collection. Contact: tehmina@curatorialresearch.com.

Equip your Facilitator’s Toolkit

This September we are excited to be offering a fantastic training opportunity for people who facilitate meetings, events, and workshops based in the South West.

The two-day ‘Facilitator’s Toolkit’ workshop, delivered by the Association of Facilitators, is a short course that will refresh the basics of facilitator style and provide you with new ways and confidence to lead groups and teams with a focus on assertiveness for facilitators. It is designed for those who want to consolidate, broaden and enliven their style of facilitation. You will be provided with facilitation models, tools and tips.

Course Content

This is an introductory course in facilitation, but it is not basic. If you are looking for a core facilitation model, and are keen to develop your personal style – then this is for you.

The workshop will explore your role as a group facilitator, paying particular attention to skills practice, and awareness building in the live group setting. Participants will have the opportunity to complete the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Inventory, a short questionnaire designed to identify ones preferred approach to conflict and to broaden one’s skill base. We shall apply assertiveness to the role of facilitator and consider Dimensions of Facilitator Style, a practical toolkit designed to equip you with the confidence and skill to effectively handle group processes and group tasks.

You will learn how to direct and guide groups assertively, this includes leading in cooperative and autonomous ways. You will be encouraged to become aware of your own skills, experience, personality and preferences, and use and flex your facilitator style with self-awareness, authority and personal presence. The topic of Group Dynamics is introduced in the context of choosing an appropriate facilitation style and approach.

Practical skills will include: 
  • Developing an assertive style
  • Managing passive, aggressive, or manipulative behaviours.
  • Contracting, setting and managing expectations
  • Being a catalyst for learning and development – moving things forward
  • Handling emotions, particularly where they hinder group effectiveness
  • Challenging and confronting limiting behaviours and attitudes
  • Working with the prevailing group dynamics to create positive outcomes
  • Planning and structuring a facilitated session
Who is this for?

If you are:

  • Working as a consultant, change agent, trainer to a client organisation
  • Working within an organisation as a change agent, group/team leader, manager or project manager
  • In chairing roles at meetings with a developmental purpose (be that business, charity or education)
  • Occasionally called upon to facilitate groups, meetings and teams
  • Embarking upon a career in facilitation.

Cost: £425 including the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Inventory

Click here to book your place

Please contact Clare Pennington if you have any questions, or call us on 01209 500 750

Guest Blog: Visiting Cornwall’s Museums the Green Way

For many people, working in a museum might sound like a dream job. I was one of those people (and indeed I still am), but this week I have been lucky enough to find the only job that is even better – working across several museums, for the wonderful Cornwall Museums Partnership. My name is Nick Collins and I’ve been here for an all-too-brief secondment from the University of Exeter as part of their Professional Pathways programme. I’ve visited museums and galleries across the county this week, and below I’m going to share my thoughts on the amazing exhibitions they’re running at the moment. There’s another theme I’d also like to share. I’ve been trying to show how we can be greener in our museum visits, and help to reduce congestion on Cornwall’s roads, which will be as busy as ever this summer. I’ve travelled to all of these exhibitions using nothing more than public transport and my trusty steed (a bicycle, not a horse). But more on that in a moment…

On Monday, I started at Penlee House to see Munnings in Cornwall, an exhibition which will take regulars there from the familiar territory of the early Newlyn School into the perhaps less familiar territory of the later Newlyn School, whilst also introducing new visitors to the beauty and humanity of this school of painting. It is that humanity which really shines through in this exhibition – perhaps ironically, given that its principle subject, Alfred Munnings, is best-known for painting horses. But, whatever the paintings, show, we have to remember that it was people who made them, and this exhibition tells those people’s stories with touching sensitivity. Often, the glimpses we get of artists’ lives are startlingly intimate. Munnings’ painting coat, palette and brushes are here, as are examples of his letters and sketchbooks and his beautiful poem to Jessica Heath. Harold Knight’s portrait of Munnings dominates the entrance to the exhibition, portraying only a few hints of the alleged tension between the two. It is one of three portraits of Munnings, another being a self-deprecating, caricatured self-portrait. Munnings’ contemporaries dominate the next two rooms, with Harold and Laura Knight, Samuel John “Lamorna” Birch, Frank Gascoigne Heath and Charles W. Simpson particularly prominent. They give us a wonderful insight into the world of the Newlyn School’s less-famous later stages.

Sir Alfred Munnings

The Lamorna Inn, 1915

Oil on canvas

Sir Alfred Munnings Museum

© Sir Alfred Munnings Museum. DACS 2019

Come Tuesday, and we made the longest trip of the week, all the way up to Bodmin (yes, by public transport!) to Cornwall’s Regimental Museum. Have a look at the video below this paragraph…

I wasn’t joking, describing music as a great morale raiser. The army has known it for centuries, a story told with great insight and originality by CRM’s Citizen Curators, in their exhibition Music, Morale and the Military. There are some fantastic objects here, including the D Day dodgers’ banjo, carried by soldiers in Italy in the Second World War in ironic reference to the derogatory nickname forced on them; and a Light Infantry Drum, which ties in very well to the rest of the museum and the superb videos which allow former members of that regiment to tell its story in their own words. The real highlights, though, are the playable 1920s piano and the new recording of the DCLI Boys Marching Song (a local song probably not heard in almost 100 years), both of which make the exhibition a fantastic place to stay for a while and enjoy the atmosphere. The exhibition was created by the Citizen Curators, a group of five volunteers who put it together over a period of several months. The programme will be running again with new volunteers from October 2019 to April 2020 across several museums in Cornwall. Have a look at the previous blog post for much more information on that.

The equivalent Citizen Curators’ exhibition at Falmouth Art Gallery has finished (until the next one!), but the spirit of community curation is alive and well in their new exhibition Stuff and Nonsense, which I saw on Wednesday. There are several pieces of community-curated art and there will be more throughout the summer. There is also the chance for every single person who walks through the door to contribute, with visitors being asked to upload photos of their own “shrines” in response to those created for the exhibition, and also to leave their own found objects alongside those in the exhibition.

The Nonsense half of this exhibition is brilliantly uplifting, featuring illustrations from Quentin Blake, Tony Ross and Edward Lear which are sure to please children and to bring out the child in the rest of us. There is even a woodblock used in the illustration of Alice in Wonderland, alongside Lewis Carrol’s diary, a real highlight. Several fantastic automata have also found their way into the exhibition. Anyone who enjoys seeing these should also make their way down to the library, housed in the same building, which features more, including an enormous example based on Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast books.

Uplifting Nonsense

To return to the transport theme, Thursday presented an unusual challenge. Many people would see Portcurno Telegraph Museum as inaccessible by public transport, but there is in fact a bus which stops right outside it. Admittedly, the unusual challenge I mentioned was the fact that said bus broke down in St Buryan on the return journey, but I’m sure that doesn’t happen often… If the owner of St Buryan Caterers, who very kindly gave me a lift back to Penzance, is reading, thanks once again!

The Telegraph Museum itself is today perhaps more relevant than it’s ever been – as we live through our own communications revolution, it becomes ever more important to understand previous ones. At Porthcurno that story is told not only in terms of the technology (which is covered superbly through working objects and demonstrations) but the people who used and made it, whose lives are shown through their photos and possessions. The highlight is the spectacular Second World War bunker, filled with hundreds of artefacts, many of which are still working. The photo here is the escape stairs, a tunnel leading from the bunker all the way to the surface and beautiful views of the valley.

The escape stairs from the Second World War bunker at Porthcurno Telegraph Museum

I finished the week just this morning at Royal Cornwall Museum for their exhibition Eye to the Sky exhibition, which tells the story of John Couch Adams, who predicted the discovery of Neptune, through Manga. It is an incredible story, and a highly innovative way of telling it. The Manga sits alongside more traditional museum objects, including a large celestial globe and the astonishingly-restored portrait of Adams, which has been transformed from quite literally having a hole in the unfortunate astronomer’s forehead to as good as new. Bringing both of these approaches together creates something far better than either style could have achieved alone.

The addition of Cornish language adds a lovely touch to the Manga which tells the story of John Couch Adams and his fellow Cornish astronomers.

So what have I learnt this week? A lot. More than I can really say. I’ve been lucky enough to work in museums before and if this experience has been an exception it’s because it’s been even better than those other times. Museums tell us stories, entertain us and make us think, but never has it been clearer to me than it has this week that they can also change lives. From the Citizen Curators who put on such wonderful exhibitions, some of whom have gone on to continued involvement in the heritage sector, to the home-educated children who I saw taking part in a workshop in Falmouth, I have come to understand that museums are about more than probably most people realise. They harness history and the arts as a positive force for the present, and it has been an honour to see how much difference that can make.

I would like to thank the University of Exeter for their part in organising this placement and for the stimulating and enlightening training I took part in there last week. Most of all, I can’t thank the people at CMP and all of the museums in the partnership enough. I hope to see you all again sometime.

Guest Blog: Join Us in Year Two of Citizen Curators

Dr Tehmina Goskar is the Director of the Curatorial Research Centre and leads Cornwall Museums Partnership’s Citizen Curators programme. We are delighted that Tehmina has kindly written this blog to answer a few FAQs  for anyone who is interested in taking part in the programme.

We have just completed a successful Year One of the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund supported Citizen Curators programme. 29 participants who joined as volunteers at their chosen museum successfully completed the programme and received a certificate for their accomplishment.

If you are interested in taking part in Year Two of Citizen Curators, here are some of your questions answered.

Two of the Citizen Curators examining some of Penlee House Gallery and Museum's collection in the object handling session.

 

What is Citizen Curators?

Citizen Curators is a free work-based training programme in museum awareness and modern curatorial practice aimed at volunteers from our community. The programme is provided by Cornwall Museums Partnership in collaboration with seven museums. It is funded for three years by the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund administered by the Museums Association. The Programme Leader is Dr. Tehmina Goskar, Curator & Director of the Curatorial Research Centre.

 

When and where does it take place?

The Citizen Curators course takes place between October 2019 – April 2020. Seven Cornish museums are taking part in the programme: Cornwall’s Regimental Museum, Bodmin, Wheal Martyn Clay Works, near St Austell, Royal Cornwall Museum, Truro, Falmouth Art Gallery, Museum of Cornish Life, Helston, Penlee House Gallery and Museum, Penzance and Telegraph Museum Porthcurno.

 

How many places are there?

Each museum has five places. Each year there will be approximately 35 volunteers undertaking the Citizen Curators course.

 

What experience and qualifications do I need?

None. Just a thirst for learning, the ability to demonstrate your curiosity, and be willing to find things out for yourself. You should be able to commit the time needed to make the most of this opportunity. We encourage you bring and to talk about your existing skills and previous experience.

 

A Citizen Curator creating music by hitting a silver plate with a spoon during the interpretation session.

 

How much time do I have to spend on the programme?

You must attend the six core sessions: collections, communities, research, interpretation, communication and curating the Cornish National Collection. These will take place on a monthly basis from October. They will take place in one of the museums in your group. That means about one full day per month. In addition, you will be working on researching and creating content about the collections in your museum. This might be according to a brief set by the museum or it might be on something your group thinks is important. You can expect to commit to between 4 hours to 1 day per fortnight on this. You are welcome to volunteer more hours but this is entirely down to you and your museum. There are also optional opportunities such as field trips and discussion events you will be invited to take part in.

 

What kinds of things will interest me?

Museum collections contain a wealth of untapped knowledge, stories, and ideas from political events and abstract art to family history and science. Our museums are waiting for you to help them share that knowledge with different people. If you get excited by new discoveries, finding something out or asking probing questions then Citizen Curators is for you. The course will teach you how to curate thoughtfully and meaningfully. It will help you to see the relationship between knowledge creation and communication and you will gain a whole set of specific skills as a result.

This year the cohort will be invited to research collections to highlight new stories, particularly those of under-represented people and subjects. This will also include getting involved in the creation of a Cornish National Collection that will reflect the diversity of Cornish society past and present, while also highlighting our distinctive culture.

 

Two Citizen Curators learn how to

 

What do I need to do to sign up?

The seven participating museums are beginning to look for their next candidates. In the first instance, check out their websites and get in touch with the museum that most appeals to you. In due course, they will send you a questionnaire to complete and we will take it from there.

You can contact the museums participating in Citizen Curators by clicking the links below:

Cornwall’s Regimental Museum 

Falmouth Art Gallery

Museum of Cornish Life, Helston

Penlee House Gallery and Museum

Royal Cornwall Museum

Telegraph Museum Porthcurno

Wheal Martyn

 

Dr Tehmina Goskar
Director, Curatorial Research Centre